Woodstove installation type

Woodstove installations can be of several types. One, for free-standing woodstove; another, for fireplace inserts.

Anatomy of a woodstove

Todd Woofenden

Although there are many different models of wood stoves, there are several basic components in all stoves. We will take a look at parts found in all woodstoves as well as those found only in some woodstoves.

American Independence

Contributing Author

Some of us are old enough to remember the energy crisis of the 1970’s that began with an oil embargo causing energy prices to quadruple overnight.  It was this sudden increase in the cost to heat our homes that lead to a resurgence of woodburning and by extension, the chimney service and hearth product industry in America.

What You Need to Know About Steel Chimney Liners

Marge Padgitt

After a chimney sweep has inspected a chimney he/she may find damages to the original liner due to exposure to rain and acidic flue gasses, chimney fire, or other cause and recommend a new chimney liner. Chimney contractors often prefer to use steel flue liners due to their relative ease of installation compared to tile liner installation, and the fact that unlike vitreous clay tile flue liners, stainless steel chimney liners are a U.L. listed product with a warranty by the manufacturer.

Wood as a sustainable fuel source for the home

Oliver Beauchemin

The Stove Industry Alliance (SIA) is pleased to endorse leading industry guidelines which establish a recognizable standard for logs used in wood burning stoves; an important step towards ensuring the continued sustainability of wood as a fuel source for the home.

Let’s clear the smoke

Contributing Author

For the last year the American public has been deluged with misleading claims regarding the EPA wood heating NSPS regulation proposals.

The contribution wood burning stoves can make to carbon reduction and sustainable energy

Oliver Beauchemin

Modern wood burning stoves are virtually carbon neutral when using current burn technology. High-quality wood emits less CO2 when burned than it does with natural decay.

EPA’s Proposed Air Rules for NEW WOODSTOVES AND PELLET STOVES

Oliver Beauchemin

On Jan 3, 2014, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed updates to its air emissions standards for new residential wood heaters that would strengthen its requirements for new woodstoves, while establishing air standards for new pellet stoves and several other types of new wood heaters for the first time.  The proposal would phase in emission limits over a five-year period, beginning in 2015.  The proposed standards would apply only to new wood heaters and will not affect wood heaters already in use in homes or currently for sale today.

EPA’s Air Rules for New Residential Wood Heaters

Oliver Beauchemin

On Jan 3, 2014, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed updates to its air emission standards for residential wood heaters that would strengthen the requirement for new woodstoves, along with establishing the first standards for several other types of wood new heaters, including new hydronic heaters and forced air furnaces. The proposal would phase in emission limits over a five-year period, beginning in 2015. The proposed standards would apply only to new wood heaters and will not affect wood heaters already in use in homes or currently for sale today.

EPA Will Hold a Public Hearing in Boston

Oliver Beauchemin

EPA Region 1 will hold a public hearing Feb. 26, 2014 in our downtown Boston office to get public input on proposed standards for the amount of air pollution that can be emitted by new woodstoves and other residential wood heaters.

Wood Heat Largest Growth Fuel in the US

Contributing Author

2011 U.S. Census Bureau’s American Housing Survey reported that 12% of all American homes now burn wood as their main source of heating fuel, compared to only 7% of homes heated with fuel oil. This change represents a doubling of wood heat use in homes and a reduction of 5% for oil fuel usage.

Page 2 of 5    < 1 2 3 4 >  Last ›
Smoke Signals: Have a question about your chimney?