EPA’s Proposed Air Rules for NEW WOODSTOVES AND PELLET STOVES

Oliver Beauchemin

On Jan 3, 2014, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed updates to its air emissions standards for new residential wood heaters that would strengthen its requirements for new woodstoves, while establishing air standards for new pellet stoves and several other types of new wood heaters for the first time.  The proposal would phase in emission limits over a five-year period, beginning in 2015.  The proposed standards would apply only to new wood heaters and will not affect wood heaters already in use in homes or currently for sale today.

EPA’s Proposed Air Rules for New Masonry Heaters

Oliver Beauchemin

On Jan 3, 2014, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed updates to its air emission standards for new residential wood heaters that would strengthen the requirements for new woodstoves, while establishing air standards for several other types of wood heaters for the first time, including masonry heaters already in use in homes or currently for sale today.

Wood Heat Largest Growth Fuel in the US

Contributing Author

2011 U.S. Census Bureau’s American Housing Survey reported that 12% of all American homes now burn wood as their main source of heating fuel, compared to only 7% of homes heated with fuel oil. This change represents a doubling of wood heat use in homes and a reduction of 5% for oil fuel usage.

Your Pellet Stove is High Maintenance

Contributing Author

Pellet stoves are positive draft appliances using a fan to blow the exhaust up and out the vent.  Because the exhaust is under positive pressure, it is essential to have total containment of the exhaust gases.  This requires having a vent that goes directly to the outside atmosphere like a chimney lining system would do in your masonry chimney or a pellet vent that directly goes outside.  Any joints in the installation must be sealed with high temperature silicone to insure containment.

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