Which is the best type of chimney flue liner

Todd Woofenden

The best type of chimney flue liner depends on many factors, including the type of appliance, the type of chimney, and its intended use ­ not to mention, who’s answering the question!

Types of chimneys

Todd Woofenden

What we usually picture when we think about chimneys is a masonry chimney: one constructed of brick, concrete blocks, or stone. But current building technology includes another major category, the factory-built chimney.

EPA’s Air Rules for New Residential Wood Heaters

Oliver Beauchemin

On Jan 3, 2014, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed updates to its air emission standards for residential wood heaters that would strengthen the requirement for new woodstoves, along with establishing the first standards for several other types of wood new heaters, including new hydronic heaters and forced air furnaces. The proposal would phase in emission limits over a five-year period, beginning in 2015. The proposed standards would apply only to new wood heaters and will not affect wood heaters already in use in homes or currently for sale today.

EPA’s Proposed Air Rules for New Masonry Heaters

Oliver Beauchemin

On Jan 3, 2014, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed updates to its air emission standards for new residential wood heaters that would strengthen the requirements for new woodstoves, while establishing air standards for several other types of wood heaters for the first time, including masonry heaters already in use in homes or currently for sale today.

Cast-in-place Flue Lining Systems

Marge Padgitt

Homeowners have asked chimneys.com for information on what types of flue lining systems are available for masonry chimneys and what the advantages or disadvantages are among them.

Cost comparison of a Cast-in-place chimney liner

Golden Flue

When contemplating the repair of a chimney, there are, unfortunately, many considerations which do not become apparent until after the work has been completed and the contractor is long gone. This frequently occurs as the result of misleading or misinformed analysis of the damaged chimney. It is all too true that when repairs are being discussed, one concern, regretfully, attracts more attention than others: price.

Creosote

Todd Woofenden

One of the great misunderstandings in the world of woodstoves is how creosote fits into the picture. Contrary to popular belief, creosote is not an inevitable product of wood burning. Creosote forms when wood is burned incompletely, and is an indication of improper use, poor installation, or a poor wood stove design.

Smoky woodstove: smoky on wet days in other rooms

Todd Woofenden

Some stoves seem to work just fine except when it is wet out. If this seems to be the case, pay close attention to the weather when you have smoking problems. It is easy to confuse wind-related problems with rain-related problems.

Smoky woodstove: smoking on windy days

Todd Woofenden

Some stoves seem to work okay except on windy days, or if the wind is coming from a specific direction. Chimney height should be considered as a possible cause. We will look at this and other possible causes.

Smoke Signals: Have a question about your chimney?